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E-Readers: In Which I Am Addicted

A year and a half ago, my husband gave me a Nook for my birthday.  I've never been against the introduction of e-readers, though I probably wouldn't have been quite so early an adopter without his gift.

It's been my constant little companion ever since.

I still love hard-copy books, don't get me wrong.  I love paper and bindings and that inky smell.  I really love old books--I've always chosen to buy vintage or antique copies of classics because they look so darn gorgeous on a shelf.
One of my shelves of pretty old poetry books.  Decorative and  fun to read!

Still, I really love having the Nook.  It comes on vacation with me and amuses me for days with hardly any luggage space taken up.  It can hold the three books I'm reading at once on my bedside table without falling over.  It's a giant help when I'm beta reading friends' projects because I can just pop a pdf on it and go anywhere.  And when I'm reading a Giant Tome my hands don't get tired or fall asleep from trying to hold five pounds of book.

Then it happened--my Nook died.  I'm not complaining, though I did expect that it would last longer than 18 months, and I still don't know *why* it died.  The screen went half-blank and apparently there's nothing that can be done about that.

But as I mentioned, I'm addicted.  I thought briefly about cutting my losses with e-readers and going back to print-only.  I finally have plenty of space in my house for books, after all!  It didn't sit well.  I like the e-reader--I really like it.

So I trolled ebay and bought one barely used for le cheaps and it came with a cute leather cover (bonus!) and I'm happily feeding my addiction again.

New used Nook in pretty case.  With business card holder and pen slot.  Since you need those while reading.
 I think the designers of the case may have over-thought this a bit.
It made me wonder--I never would have thought that I would adopt this technology so early, that I would like it so much, and that it would change how I thought about buying and reading books.  It definitely has.  How have e-readers affected your reading habits--or have they?  

Comments

  1. I don't have one yet. ): I've been thinking about it though, because lately I've been going on a book buying spree and I'm running out of space to put the books! I love those poetry books. They look like the sort of thing you would see in films like Harry Potter :D

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  2. Oh yes, I am such an e-reader convert! (Kindle being my flavour of choice.) It's changed my habits in a few ways, which I didn't really expect:

    1. I read a lot more, because I can slip my Kindle in my bag easily (especially as most of my reading is massive fantasy tomes!). Also, I hate it when books get mangled in my bag (I'm one of those weird people who try to keep their books pristine - no cracking the spine for me!), which isn't a worry with my Kindle, safe in its case.

    2. I used to get really annoyed at buying a book and finding it was rubbish two chapters in (that's £8 wasted!), so one of the things I love about e-readers is getting to sample the first few chapters before deciding to buy.

    3. I read all my fiction on my Kindle, but I still get hard copies of sewing books and some non-fiction.

    I am a massive convert to the Kindle, but I wasn't at all convinced until I saw a friend's and could see for myself how awesome it was!

    Glad you managed to get a new e-reader - I'll be gutted when my Kindle one day gives up the ghost!

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  3. Right now I'm working my way through some book-sale books right now, but when I'm using my Kindle I do read a lot more, mostly public domain stuff. I'm very gleeful about how I can read scans of a book printed in the 18th century. I've never been one to buy a lot of new books, but with all of the free/very cheap ebooks on Amazon I do it more often (although they also tend to make me irritated at historical inaccuracies/enormous plotholes/poor writing more often, so I should probably not bother).

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  4. I thought I'd be a you-can-have-my-hardback-books-when-you-pry-them-from-my-cold-dead-fingers kind of person. But then I got my Kindle. I LOVE e-readers.

    I still love old books. But for convenience, space saving, and treadmill reading, they cannot be equaled.

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  5. I like my Nook but it's not great for reading more challenging books that I'd like to flip around in. (Wait, what happened back ten pages ago? Oh, too much effort to use the page finding feature ...) Definitely good for vacation though.

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