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In Which I Finally Get to Say: Orbit is Publishing My Book!

I realize I’ve been a little quiet around here recently.  Moms of toddlers will tell you that it’s when things get quiet in their houses that they know *something* is happening.  With toddlers, silent happenings are usually not a good thing.  In writing? They can be a really awesome thing.

Long story short (when does that ever happen writing novels?): I’m incredibly excited to announce that Orbit will be publishing my novel Torn in spring of 2018—and even more exciting, we’ll be publishing a trilogy! The story follows a seamstress who can embed good luck charms into her creations--and becomes entangled in a revolution.

Obligatory Publisher's Marketplace screenshot--because this little blurb means this is super-duper, 100%, don't bother pinching me official!



Long story less short: Want to have the most exciting day of your career and then sit on the news for months? Then writing and publishing books is for you!  This has been in the works for a while, and though I’ve known for a while that Orbit had interest in this book, we're ready to announce!  There are all kinda of behind-the-scenes things you don’t necessarily think about while you’re blithely typing away on your novel, and I'm thrilled about what Orbit has in store for this novel and its sequels!

Good things are worth the wait, and beyond the obvious Good Thing of a publishing deal, I’m absolutely thrilled about where I landed.  My editor, Sarah Guan, is not only a genius, not only gets the novel and what I’m trying to accomplish with it, she’s an incredibly lovely person.  I can’t wait to continue working with the rest of the Orbit team, too!


And of course, a huge shout-out to my agent extraordinaire, who has stuck with me not only through this deal but for the long haul leading up to it.  Jessica Sinsheimer, you’re awesomesauce with a macaron on top.

Because of course The Big Day of Giant Announcement Happiness would coincide with the day your child is home from school because of fog (thanks, weather) and that you're baking obligatory pies (thanks, giant family picnic), I'll just say--squeeee! and there will be more news and updates to come.  Thanks to everyone who has supported, encouraged, and occasionally smacked me so far--you're appreciated more than you know.

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